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Thread: Buying a cut throat for my father.. Not sure if its a good idea.

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    Default Buying a cut throat for my father.. Not sure if its a good idea.

    Hey guys. I'm looking at buying a Dovo cut throat for my father for Christmas but I need some advice. The thing is that he has a heart condition and takes blood thinning medication so his blood is typically thinner than average. I'm worried if I buy him a razor that he could badly cut himself while shaving and bleed out. Since I'm almost positive he's a noob I'm expecting he will nick himself a few times while learning. What do you all think?

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    It depends on what his clotting time is.

    I take low-dose aspirin, and I do OK with a straight razor. A styptic pencil is plenty to stop my bleeding. But low-dose aspirin isn't exactly a "blood thinner".

    If I read this document correctly:

    Reference Range for Prothrombin Time-Coumadin — UVA Health System

    the "worst-case" situation is that his blood will take about 4 times longer to clot than "normal" (non-drug) time.

    So -- at the very least -- I'd include a styptic pencil, or a block of alum, with the razor.

    And if I were you, I'd probably ask a doctor, rather than relying on something I read on the Internet.

    . Charles
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    . . . . . Mindful shaving, for a better world.

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    Senior Member tiddle's Avatar
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    A small knick from a razor can be stopped with alum blocks fine. No worse than a paper cut. You can use the new skin liquid bandadge for anything that takes over a minute. T he warning is more for someone who is at risk for deeper than cutaneous or second pink looking layer of skin. Someone who does like woodworking or a mechanic who runs a risk of subcutaneous cuts, the last deep layer just above your fatty tissue. It will be fine.
    Mastering implies there is nothing more for you to learn of something... I prefer proficient enough to not totally screw it up.

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    Senior Member DoughBoy68's Avatar
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    + on Charles advise to ask a doctor....better safe than sorry!

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    Senior Member Furcifer's Avatar
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    It might well be that he chooses to just keep it, as a collector knife or something like that. He should check with his own doctor about any such concerns, but as mentioned, I don't think shaving cuts are a major threat - they are among the most sterile type of day-to-day injury that humans sustain, and there are no major opportunities for blood loss.

    Even so, everybody should know and respect the straight razor blade for what it is! Gotta be careful when stropping, etc., because whipping that blade around carelessly and absent-minded movements when holding it is when a serious cut somewhere other than the face will happen.

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    What is he shaving with now? Has he cut himself? Most of the time the cuts from a straight are small weepers that are handled with a styptic pencil. I would still check with his doctor. I hope he can join our party.

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    He shaves with standard disposable razors. I think he'd like this.

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    Incidere in dimidium Cangooner's Avatar
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    I think you've received some excellent advice here.

    The vast majority of cuts caused by a straight razor during shaving are minor and superficial and therefore *should* not cause a significant problem. That having been said, none of us here are familiar with your father's particular medical situation and so cannot provide a truly well-informed opinion on whether they would prove dangerous to him. Therefore checking with an M.D. makes an awful lot of sense.

    If, as I suspect will be the case, he is cleared for straight razor takeoff, then go for it! And send him here as he will get all the tips, advice, and guidance he needs to keep the cut factor down to a minimum.

    Good luck!
    Last edited by Cangooner; 12-16-2012 at 03:52 PM.

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    Member AFDavis11's Avatar
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    I would get him a great brush, some soaps, and some creams.

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