Results 1 to 10 of 10
Like Tree12Likes
  • 4 Post By tcrideshd
  • 2 Post By spazola
  • 3 Post By Bruno
  • 3 Post By jfk742

Thread: Anybody making razors via stock removal only?

  1. #1
    DVW
    DVW is online now
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Eastern Washington State USA
    Posts
    192
    Thanked: 26

    Default Anybody making razors via stock removal only?

    Just a quick question for the razor makers here. Are any of you not forging them? I haven't noticed any yet. I understand why we forge if we want a pattern welded steel (that is obvious). I forge simply because the steel I have is the wrong shape for a razor. There is enough material there, but in the wrong places (leaf springs and coil springs). If you forge simply because you want to, that is a great reason as well.

    I was thinking of buying some new steel for a razor project (80CRV2) and I would simply purchase it with the correct width and thickness to cut and grind it to shape. Hence, I was just curious if there is anyone here that chooses to use stock removal only since I have not ran across any that specified it was a stock removal only project.

    This isn't a forged vs stock removal question. This is a question from one hobbyist to another who likes to discuss different techniques as I pick out my steel order.

  2. #2
    High Priest of Low Budget Shaving CrescentCityRazors's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2019
    Location
    New Orleans LA
    Posts
    259
    Thanked: 24

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DVW View Post
    Just a quick question for the razor makers here. Are any of you not forging them? I haven't noticed any yet. I understand why we forge if we want a pattern welded steel (that is obvious). I forge simply because the steel I have is the wrong shape for a razor. There is enough material there, but in the wrong places (leaf springs and coil springs). If you forge simply because you want to, that is a great reason as well.

    I was thinking of buying some new steel for a razor project (80CRV2) and I would simply purchase it with the correct width and thickness to cut and grind it to shape. Hence, I was just curious if there is anyone here that chooses to use stock removal only since I have not ran across any that specified it was a stock removal only project.

    This isn't a forged vs stock removal question. This is a question from one hobbyist to another who likes to discuss different techniques as I pick out my steel order.
    I am something of a newb at making razors. I have made a few razors, all by stock removal. A forge of some sort is still needed, of course, for annealing and HT'ing. I now have a Paragon electric kiln but before, I was using charcoal and a hair dryer LOL! Magnet for the sticky test, peanut oil for quenching, toaster oven for tempering. A couple came out so-so. A couple (more than a couple, actually) were learning mistakes. A few were pretty decent blades. I even sold a couple. I have two or three around somewhere that I need to find and finish. One of my planned projects is a twin grinder setup and when I have that onstream, I will be making them on a regular basis.

    Decide the width you want. Divide by 4. That is your stock thickness, to be quick and dirty about it. If you want a 6/8 blade, start with 3/16" stock. 8/8, 1/4" stock. FULLY anneal the steel before you start cutting and grinding. It will save a lot of time and also grinding media.

    I am not familiar with the steel you want to use. I have used 1095 and O1 and I think 1084, and I have a little O1 and 1095 on hand. Good stuff, easy to get decent results.Very common, and good data available. I don't have a "proper" belt grinder, and never have. I will be building my twin grinder out of two 4" x 36" belt sanders. A real, grownup belt grinder, maybe some day.

    I have never made a razor from leaf springs, but I have made a couple of knives. It works but a proper tool/cutlery steel is better. I have made kitchen knives out of old circular and tablesaw blades. OLD ones. New ones don't seem to work well for me.
    Pretty don't shave. Sharp shaves.
    https://www.crescentcityrazors.com

  3. #3
    DVW
    DVW is online now
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Eastern Washington State USA
    Posts
    192
    Thanked: 26

    Default

    Thanks for the post. I've already made a few razors. I've owned my belt grinder for almost 30 years now and used a variety of steels and techniques over the years, but I'm still very much a "student" when it comes to razors. (They are a different beast) I was just wondering about the advantages of buying metal for forging vs stock removal. Are guys finding that they waste too much steel if they only grind? Can I save a significant amount of money by buying round stock and forging it to 90% complete vs buying a large flat stock and grinding away the majority of it? I can see needing a really wide piece of steel if you had an exaggerated tail design for example and were not forging. I've noticed that guys are buying flat stock and then forging that into a razor. Am I missing an advantage to doing that?

  4. #4
    Senior Member blabbermouth tcrideshd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Oakland Tn
    Posts
    5,705
    Thanked: 1672

    Default

    Bob Allman was stock removal mostly and Brian Brown did stock removal for his production line
    “ I,m getting the impression that everyone thinks I have TIME to fix their bikes”

  5. #5
    Senior Member blabbermouth spazola's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Burkburnett TX
    Posts
    2,704
    Thanked: 2277

    Default

    Butch Harner, also
    RezDog and DVW like this.

  6. The Following User Says Thank You to spazola For This Useful Post:

    tcrideshd (06-30-2020)

  7. #6
    DVW
    DVW is online now
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Eastern Washington State USA
    Posts
    192
    Thanked: 26

    Default

    I looked up Butch Harner. He does nice work and is kind enough to post his techniques and even his failures. I noticed that he is using 52100 for razors, so I guess that could be another reason for stock removal. That can be tricky to forge. Unless someone else has another thought, then I don't see any reasons other than price, availability and razor design for not ordering a piece sized for stock removal. Thanks guys

  8. #7
    Heat it and beat it Bruno's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Belgium
    Posts
    14,669
    Thanked: 5073
    Blog Entries
    10

    Default

    Depending on how well you forge, you need to spend a lot less time grinding and removing stock if your grinding phase starts with a blank that is forged close to size.
    spazola, DVW and jfk742 like this.
    Til shade is gone, til water is gone, Into the shadow with teeth bared, screaming defiance with the last breath.
    To spit in Sightblinder’s eye on the Last Day

  9. #8
    DVW
    DVW is online now
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Eastern Washington State USA
    Posts
    192
    Thanked: 26

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bruno View Post
    Depending on how well you forge, you need to spend a lot less time grinding and removing stock if your grinding phase starts with a blank that is forged close to size.
    True, I tend to find that I prefer forging over grinding.

  10. #9
    Senior Member jfk742's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Pinole, ca
    Posts
    1,341
    Thanked: 302

    Default

    What Bruno said.

    I hear that 80crv2 is pretty easy move on the anvil. I was actually looking at some of my tool steel bar stock a few minutes before I logged in. The amount of waste to make an 8/8 razor would be the equivalent of 2 razors if I forged them. I can fairly easily get a 10/8 out of 1/4 x 1” bar stock.
    Knives for me are the tools that I want to do stock removal for. Hammering in a tip, reducing the tang and drawing it out. Lots of hammering, then making it thin and flat enough as not spend all day grinding to straighten out my poor blacksmithing skills.

    As far as time and enjoyment go, for me? Forge a razor, stock removal for knives. Though that being said I haven’t made a stock removal knife yet but plan on doing so for the next try at some chef’s knives.

    As an aside, CrescentCity, would love to see some pictures of your work.
    spazola, 32t and DVW like this.

  11. #10
    High Priest of Low Budget Shaving CrescentCityRazors's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2019
    Location
    New Orleans LA
    Posts
    259
    Thanked: 24

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jfk742 View Post
    What Bruno said.

    I hear that 80crv2 is pretty easy move on the anvil. I was actually looking at some of my tool steel bar stock a few minutes before I logged in. The amount of waste to make an 8/8 razor would be the equivalent of 2 razors if I forged them. I can fairly easily get a 10/8 out of 1/4 x 1” bar stock.
    Knives for me are the tools that I want to do stock removal for. Hammering in a tip, reducing the tang and drawing it out. Lots of hammering, then making it thin and flat enough as not spend all day grinding to straighten out my poor blacksmithing skills.

    As far as time and enjoyment go, for me? Forge a razor, stock removal for knives. Though that being said I haven’t made a stock removal knife yet but plan on doing so for the next try at some chef’s knives.

    As an aside, CrescentCity, would love to see some pictures of your work.
    Don't have any on hand, though there are two or three barely started blanks laying around somewhere. And some GD regrinds that you might find particularly interesting. It was actually regrinding the GDs that got me interested in stock removal razors. I will get some pics up tomorrow or the next day.
    Pretty don't shave. Sharp shaves.
    https://www.crescentcityrazors.com

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •