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Thread: The making of Razors. 1908, The Geneva Cutlery Co.

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    Senior Member blabbermouth Leatherstockiings's Avatar
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    I found the reference to using Belgium blue hones interesting.

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    Martin103 (01-03-2016)

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    Historically Inquisitive Martin103's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leatherstockiings View Post
    I found the reference to using Belgium blue hones interesting.
    Well actually they say Belgium blue and white, or old rock stone, so basically a Coticule.
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    Senior Member blabbermouth engine46's Avatar
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    I got a Genco the other day that I haven't seen hardly at all. On the opposite side of the tang it says made by W.R. Case, Bradford, PA which I knew there was a connection between the two. The tip has a small chip in it but I can grind it out.

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    Historically Inquisitive Martin103's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by engine46 View Post
    I got a Genco the other day that I haven't seen hardly at all. On the opposite side of the tang it says made by W.R. Case, Bradford, PA which I knew there was a connection between the two. The tip has a small chip in it but I can grind it out.
    Indeed W. R. Case bought out the razor division of The Geneva Cutlery in 1936, manufactured in Bradford, Pa, till 1955.
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    Senior Member caccia's Avatar
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    This shaves good as any I have,better actually.Hope it's ok to add this to this thread.They took the time to make a razor for someones request.It is nearly 7/8.

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    Historically Inquisitive Martin103's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by engine46 View Post
    Martin, this is truly very interesting.
    My latest book is "The Knife Makers Who Won the West" by Harvey Platts. It starts out when America offered better positions for cutlers so some started coming from Sheffield. One of them was Charlie W Platts who came from a long line of knife makers there. In 1852 at the age of 14 years old he began his cutlers apprenticeship & worked for some of the finest firms including Joseph Rodgers & Sons in Sheffield until he mastered all the different skills in knife making so at 26 years old he moved his family in 1864 to America where he first took a position at the American Knife Co in Reynolds Bridge, Connecticut & history goes from there. So far I have found this book very informative of the American cutlery industry. Another cool book I got awhile back was called "From Mesters To Masters" by Clyde Binfield & David Hey plus it also has a chapter in it by Geoffrey Tweedale.
    Interesting Steve, another good book is Geoffrey Tweedale. Sheffield Steel and America: A Century of Commercial and Technological Interdependence, 1830-1930. It is partially available on google books.
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    Senior Member blabbermouth engine46's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Martin103 View Post
    Interesting Steve, another good book is Geoffrey Tweedale. Sheffield Steel and America: A Century of Commercial and Technological Interdependence, 1830-1930. It is partially available on google books.

    Thanks Martin, may have to check that book out. I think it is one of my "Knives & Razors" by Jim Sargent which tells all about Case being associated with Geneva & several other razor makers back in the day. That's one thing good about his books, they give a lot of information about Case.

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