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Thread: Vintage French Razor identification help

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    Default Vintage French Razor identification help

    I got this beauty last week, a hefty 6/8" quarter hollow with beautiful spine work. Looks like new, seems to be never used except the loss of gold emboss. Maybe it was polished by someone before. Mop inlay in one of scales with some silver looking ornaments. Although one of the scales is badly bent I think I will keep them as they are. Is there a safe and effcient way to straighten the bent celluloid scales by the way?

    Maker label says M. Hanudet, thiers ? maybe?. I guess the blank was ground by Fermarud brothers in Germany. A 31930 number is scribed to the scales. Maybe it was belonged to someone at that time.

    On the Blank it says:

    FEM. FERMARUD NACHSCHEIFF

    Special pour real Sensible ?

    I hope you guys can give me some insight.

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    Last edited by Ozgun; 11-24-2021 at 06:59 AM.

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    Giveaway Guru. Keeper of the Vault! Gasman's Avatar
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    with heat, you can straighten. But my guess is the side with the inlay is the bent side. And probably at the inlay. This happens a lot. A heat lamp and some wood spacers properly wedged between the scales and clamped to cool can help get it closer, but to really straighten you need to unpin it. Nice looking blade. I had a China-made razor with those scallops on the spine. It was junk. Never would hold an edge. Not saying yours is China-made. I do like the spine work.
    It's just Sharpening, right?
    Jerry...

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    Senior Member blabbermouth RezDog's Avatar
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    It is a nice looking razor for sure, and all the French made razors I have are very good.
    It's not what you know, it's who you take fishing!

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    Preserver of old grinding methods hatzicho's Avatar
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    No info on the original french maker - should be M. Chanudet, Thiers as I read it. Maybe you can find some infos on the french forums, for example here:
    https://coupechouclub.1fr1.net/t2272...heme-de-la-mer

    But the blade was reground by the Fermarud company in Germany (Nachschliff = reground).

    Regards Peter
    Last edited by hatzicho; 11-24-2021 at 06:13 PM.

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    Senior Member blabbermouth Kees's Avatar
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    This does not really look like a reground blade to me. I wonder, wouldn't Nachschliff here mean that it was honed before it was sold?
    Plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose. Jean-Baptiste Alphonse Karr.

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    Preserver of old grinding methods hatzicho's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kees View Post
    This does not really look like a reground blade to me. I wonder, wouldn't Nachschliff here mean that it was honed before it was sold?
    No the german "Nachschliff" clearly means reground. Honing would be named as "Abziehen - abgezogen". Regrinding of razors was very common in the past, speaking with old grinders it sometimes was the main thing they had to do. And if larger companies had been doing the regrind, they often add an etching like on the above blad.

    Regards Peter

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    A random observation FWIW - French surnames even today are quite regional. Chanudet is found a lot in Burgundy and the Beaujolais, so perhaps the original French maker might have been in Dijon or Lyon (?)

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    Senior Member MichaelS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cotedupy View Post
    A random observation FWIW - French surnames even today are quite regional. Chanudet is found a lot in Burgundy and the Beaujolais, so perhaps the original French maker might have been in Dijon or Lyon (?)
    Indeed and Thiers is only an hour's drive from Lyon.

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    Ah, so it is!

    That looks a distinct possibility then I imagine.

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    A member at b&b had written this:

    "A straight was a tool and as such it had to be treated well to please it’s possessor. Competition was tough, more than 300 families worked in Solingen (..blades, scales etc.. ) and yes they would position their product through different segment, high end included.
    Some german examples :
    Puma gold, Bohler Stahl Dreifuss Gold, Bambola magnesium, Mauser 7/8, Globus Gold, Dorko 1151...

    The French did the same with specific models they usually named “hors concours” which were produced to celebrate an event or exhibition. They also produced high end razors like M. Chanudet, P, Fritisse (Fortunatus), Essercheroup, Vauzy à l’ Eglise
    Etc..."

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