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Thread: Razor Burn

  1. #1
    Senior Member mikedelo's Avatar
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    Default Razor Burn

    Hello!

    I have been shaving with a DE for a few weeks now and I have developed razor burn on the ride side of my neck. I have never expeirenced razor burn on my neck using a cartridge razor.

    Any ideas of why this is happening and how I can clean this area up for good?

    Thanks,

    Mike

  2. #2
    Member MAW76's Avatar
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    Couple of things.

    1. blade worn out
    2. or is so sharp it is removing more than dead skin and hair (but using DE highly doubt it)
    3. improper technique i.e. not following the grain on first pass.


    that being said, treat it afterwards cold rinse for sure, but a good quality skin balm will help treat your skin so that other things don't irritate more like collar, sweat.

    hope this helps

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    Please dont mind my bad english, iŽ Rockabillyhelge's Avatar
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    I get Razor burn especially left and right from my larynge, mostly this happens when the beard wasnt prepared good enough, the pressure on the razor was too much or when is shaved against the grain there but if i get razor burn it depends on the Razor and the Blade too. What DE and what Baldes do you use?

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    Senior Member blabbermouth
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    It may be happening because of too much pressure on the razor, a bad angle on the razor and or a dull blade. A cartridge razor's head pivots to help maintain an angle and a DE doesn't so you have to be conscious of your angles more as you control them. A cartridge razor can be lighter than a DE and if you use the same pressure with a DE it may be too much.

    I would not shave for a few days and put some aftershave balm on the spot till it is not sensitive anymore before shaving again.

    Bob
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    The Hurdy Gurdy Man thebigspendur's Avatar
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    Well, dang, Bob said everything I was gonna say.
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  10. #6
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    It's pretty easy to get razor burn with a DE, in some ways much easier than with a straight razor due to the nature of DE blades. Indeed the main culprits are angle, pressure and blade condition. Additional prep will help but if those three factors are off you will likely get irritation. However if you get all the factors right you'll be rewarded with some fantastic shaves.

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    Senior Member blabbermouth OCDshaver's Avatar
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    I've found that when it comes to DE shaving there will be one right blade that works for a person. There may be a handful that are ok and work but only one brand that really works the best. The wrong ones will deliver all sorts of problems, razor burn being one of them. Some blades may simply be too sharp for your skin. I don't subscribe to the opinion that the sharpest blade is the best. I find that it simply depends on the person. Try a few different blades. You may find another that works better for you.

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    Senior Member vgod's Avatar
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    funny after reading all the posts they all said about what i would refer to.

    1. to much pressure
    2. wrong angle
    3. bad lather
    4. face not like that blade
    5. shaving against grain

    good luck.

    darren

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    Senior Member mikedelo's Avatar
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    I am not using a dull blade and I do not think my pressure is the problem. After reading the replies, I think it is the angling and my prep. I am going to lay low with shaving for a little bit, let the hair grow back and the skin to repair itself. I need to purchase pre shave oil and shaving balm for after. Can anyone make any recommendations? Right now, I only use Mama Bear shaving soap and after my shave I use a moisturizer.

    How do I know if I am using the right technique?

    Mike

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    The Assyrian Obie's Avatar
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    Mike,
    I add one more thought to what these gentlemen have suggested: Economize your strokes by avoiding multiple strokes over the same area, especially the sensitive parts on the neck. I usually do one or two strokes maximum over a specific area in each pass and move on, knowing the second and third pass in set directions will take care of it. The beard is reduced gradually by having different passes. If you're doing three or four strokes in each spot in each pass, by the time you're done with the shave that spot has been scraped multiple times with the blade, which is a prescription for skin irritation.

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