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Thread: Wet Shaving Helped My Autistic Nephew

  1. #11
    Recovering truckdriver poppy926's Avatar
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    I don't post here very often anymore but I just had to say thank you for sharing this touching story. I also applaud you for doing this for your nephew. Wet shavers rule!

  2. #12
    Senior Member Siguy's Avatar
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    What a wonderful story.

    Blog This Post??

  3. #13
    The Hurdy Gurdy Man thebigspendur's Avatar
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    My older son is developmentally disabled and I have been shaving him with a DE for quite some time. He looks very forward to the ritual with the soaps and the brush and the hot towel and the After Shave afterwards.
    No matter how many men you kill you can't kill your successor-Emperor Nero

  4. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to thebigspendur For This Useful Post:

    asudue86 (02-07-2015), Razorfeld (01-30-2015), rolodave (01-31-2015)

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    illegitimum non carborundum Utopian's Avatar
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    I too applaud the OP.

    I'm about to make a suggestion that at first blush may seem stupid, but it is up to the uncle and nephew to determine whether or not it truly is. OK, here goes.

    You MAY want to consider giving him the opportunity to transition to a straight.

    Bear with me please. A DE shave works quite well, no doubt about it. Unfortunately, or fortunately, depending on the situation, a DE shave can be very fast. On the other hand, a straight razor shave requires much more precision, and with it, an opportunity to take more time. This is an opportunity for intense focus for a somewhat extended time. Lathering, stropping, shaving, and clean-up--this can all be very pleasing for an autistic person.

    In fact, honing can be quite pleasurable for a autistic person too!
    Geezer and rolodave like this.

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    Senior Member RollinCoal69's Avatar
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    Man this is just awesome!!!! I have a young cousin who is autistic. I know first hand from being around him what you are going through. Congrats to you for taking the time to not only help groom him but to make it more relaxing. very cool.
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  7. #16
    Senior Member tom475's Avatar
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    I read this and loved the story. While my wife and I don't have to deal with the roller coaster of children with truly unique needs, we try and help out our friends that are in this situation as best as we can. She has kind of been laughing at me (as wives often do) since I started getting into wet shaving and joining this forum. When I read her the story, she started to "puff up" and felt that it was an "extremely cool" thing you did. In fact she commented about sharing it (Facebook and other social media), if you are good with that? She and I feel that there is enough garbage (keeping this 'G' rated) out there and there needs to be more good positive stories.

    While I like to think I have a better than average command of the English language, I am at a loss for words to better describe what you did. All the positive comments here are true but the real beauty is not captured in words. The real beauty is captured in the warm feelings inside each person who is truly moved by what you helped your nephew experience. You took "torture" and made it exciting and fun, something he looks forward to.

    To put a point to it, you made a HUGE improvement to his personal life!! What more can be done from one person to another.
    Geezer, rolodave and Razorfeld like this.
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  8. #17
    Member CtwoHsix0h's Avatar
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    I read this post last night and couldn't get it out of my head all day. I, too, have a nephew who is autistic, so I'm well aware of the challenges children and adults on the spectrum face every day -- things that most of us take for granted. Helping your nephew get over his aversion to shaving may seem small, but little victories like that can have a far-reaching effect. What you've done for that young man is wonderful. I hope that when my nephew is old enough to shave, I can do the same for him. Thank you for posting your story.
    Geezer and Siguy like this.
    ~Rob~

  9. #18
    Senior Member Siguy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CtwoHsix0h View Post
    I read this post last night and couldn't get it out of my head all day. I, too, have a nephew who is autistic, so I'm well aware of the challenges children and adults on the spectrum face every day -- things that most of us take for granted. Helping your nephew get over his aversion to shaving may seem small, but little victories like that can have a far-reaching effect. What you've done for that young man is wonderful. I hope that when my nephew is old enough to shave, I can do the same for him. Thank you for posting your story.
    You go for it, Rob. I don't have any autistic children in my family, but have helped them in the past, particularly, under 8's.

    small things to us can be all-consuming to a person with autism. Large things to us can be ignored or perceived as a mere annoyance to a person with autism.

    Simon
    Geezer and CtwoHsix0h like this.

  10. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by tom475 View Post
    I read this and loved the story. While my wife and I don't have to deal with the roller coaster of children with truly unique needs, we try and help out our friends that are in this situation as best as we can. She has kind of been laughing at me (as wives often do) since I started getting into wet shaving and joining this forum. When I read her the story, she started to "puff up" and felt that it was an "extremely cool" thing you did. In fact she commented about sharing it (Facebook and other social media), if you are good with that? She and I feel that there is enough garbage (keeping this 'G' rated) out there and there needs to be more good positive stories.

    While I like to think I have a better than average command of the English language, I am at a loss for words to better describe what you did. All the positive comments here are true but the real beauty is not captured in words. The real beauty is captured in the warm feelings inside each person who is truly moved by what you helped your nephew experience. You took "torture" and made it exciting and fun, something he looks forward to.

    To put a point to it, you made a HUGE improvement to his personal life!! What more can be done from one person to another.
    Yes. Please share the story. I have no issues at all. I simple wanted to let the forum know how wet shaving has made our lives better. It's amazing how a seemingly small decision in one's life can change many other aspects of your life.

  11. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Utopian View Post
    I too applaud the OP.

    I'm about to make a suggestion that at first blush may seem stupid, but it is up to the uncle and nephew to determine whether or not it truly is. OK, here goes.

    You MAY want to consider giving him the opportunity to transition to a straight.

    Bear with me please. A DE shave works quite well, no doubt about it. Unfortunately, or fortunately, depending on the situation, a DE shave can be very fast. On the other hand, a straight razor shave requires much more precision, and with it, an opportunity to take more time. This is an opportunity for intense focus for a somewhat extended time. Lathering, stropping, shaving, and clean-up--this can all be very pleasing for an autistic person.

    In fact, honing can be quite pleasurable for a autistic person too!
    I've thought about trying to shave him with a straight, but my one concern is him always jerking his head. He typically doesn't do it but that "option" is always there. And too, while I do use my straight, I'm as good at it at this point as I would like. I still get some cuts more than I would like and that's not something I want to do to my nephew. With all that said, it maybe something we venture into later on.

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