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Thread: Stropping question

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by beluga View Post
    And that’s the rub - one might end up just sliding the wedge’s blade on its side with no meaningful contact with the edge.
    I don’t think wedges lend themselves to this sort of technique.


    B.
    Unless it was honed with the spine elevated (which you should not do) flat is where it should be stropped.
    Many hone wedges with a couple layers of tape and that will give no reprocussions when stropping flat.
    outback and PaulFLUS like this.

  2. #12
    Senior Member blabbermouth outback's Avatar
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    Yep. They all strop the same. Flat.
    stoneandstrop likes this.
    Mike

  3. #13
    Senior Member blabbermouth PaulFLUS's Avatar
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    Stoneandstrop beat me to it. If and unless you have a "true wedge" you should not need to raise or torque the blade. If in that case you do, put a couple of layers of electrical tape on the spine. Sometimes it just makes a different sound. Go slowly and be methodical and you should be fine. Someone mentioned denim on cardboard. You can also use just the cardboard. In fact I use a cereal box to make pasted strops for lying on a flat surface for new stroppers. Some people also use newspaper.
    Last edited by PaulFLUS; 03-10-2023 at 09:53 PM.
    Iron by iron is sharpened, And a man sharpens the face of his friend. PR 27:17

  4. #14
    Home of the Mysterious Symbol CrescentCityRazors's Avatar
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    Even on my rather expensive Kanayama, there is a distinct difference in pitch between the "away" stroke and the "return" stroke. It's not anything to worry about. If you are getting the same tactile feedback both ways then there is nothing seriously wrong with your strop or technique, as long as you are always landing the spine before the edge. Make it a point to always keep the spine on the strop and when you make the turn, flip the EDGE up and over, never the spine. If there is a shoulder or stabilizer, don't let it ride on the strop. Even if the strop is wide enough to take the full length of the blade, a slight x-stroke is advisable. A slight pressure is beneficial, too much is too much, but there is a wide range in there that will work just fine. Strop should be pulled taut but not guitar string tight. Not with your whole bodyweight stretching it. Neither should there be a big belly of slack in it.

    The razor could be ground or honed somewhat assymetrically, but that, too, is seldom an issue, unless it was honed with the spine severely elevated. Mostly what you hear is a simple accoustical phenomenon that in fact most guys don't really even notice or make a big deal about.

    Are your shaves satisfactory? After a dozen shaves and stroppings, if there is a problem, you will know it.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by CrescentCityRazors View Post
    Even on my rather expensive Kanayama, there is a distinct difference in pitch between the "away" stroke and the "return" stroke. It's not anything to worry about. If you are getting the same tactile feedback both ways then there is nothing seriously wrong with your strop or technique, as long as you are always landing the spine before the edge. Make it a point to always keep the spine on the strop and when you make the turn, flip the EDGE up and over, never the spine. If there is a shoulder or stabilizer, don't let it ride on the strop. Even if the strop is wide enough to take the full length of the blade, a slight x-stroke is advisable. A slight pressure is beneficial, too much is too much, but there is a wide range in there that will work just fine. Strop should be pulled taut but not guitar string tight. Not with your whole bodyweight stretching it. Neither should there be a big belly of slack in it.

    The razor could be ground or honed somewhat assymetrically, but that, too, is seldom an issue, unless it was honed with the spine severely elevated. Mostly what you hear is a simple accoustical phenomenon that in fact most guys don't really even notice or make a big deal about.

    Are your shaves satisfactory? After a dozen shaves and stroppings, if there is a problem, you will know it.
    Thanks for this information. In fact my shaves are getting better with practice. Right now I am using a Wostenholm wedge, which I have found much easier to use that a vintage hollow ground that I have, what degree of hollow I donít know. I will try it again.
    outback likes this.

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