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Thread: 7/8 Hollow grinding

  1. #11
    Senior Member jfk742's Avatar
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    I would live to see some of that masecraft faux ivory if you have a picture of a razor in a set of scales.

    I’ll have to try some cork belts. How do they compare to scotch bright? The razors are looking good!

  2. #12
    At this point in time... gssixgun's Avatar
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    Those are looking really nice

    Huge fan of the Korn Double Concave grind !!!!
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    "No amount of money spent on a Stone can ever replace the value of the time it takes learning to use it properly"
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    Proprietor - GemStar Custom Razors Honing/Restores/Regrinds Website

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    Quote Originally Posted by jfk742 View Post
    I would live to see some of that masecraft faux ivory if you have a picture of a razor in a set of scales.

    I’ll have to try some cork belts. How do they compare to scotch bright? The razors are looking good!
    I have a thread about the Masecraft Ivory in the workshop section. Shouldn't be too far down the list. There's a photo in there but it's pretty hard to capture the nuances, especially after polishing the scales. I'm looking forward to the Warther ivory getting here, they have two types, +R and +S, one is a flat-sawn effect and the other has the Schreger line patterning you'd get in quarter-sawn.

    I much prefer the cork belts over the Scotchbrite/non-woven belts since they don't seem to round surfaces as much as they're much stiffer surfaced. I really can't stand it when all the lines on a razor kind of melt together. The cork belts really complement the Trizact belts, there really isn't any need for anything else apart from some coarse ceramics for roughing out. Once I get into the 400-800 grit range I will alternate between Trizact and cork, the cork softens any errant scratches from the Trizact, I rarely find myself having to go back down to a lower grit. Using layout blue or a Sharpie helps too, I color all over the blade faces so when I'm grinding, any deep scratches from a previous grit will be very obvious.

    It's very important to work up the grits. I'll rough everything in with 40 Grit ceramic, then go to Trizacts A300, A160, A65, A45, Cork 400, Cork 600, A30, Cork 800, A20, A16, A5. Sounds like a lot but it's actually pretty fast since you're working sytematically and in batch form. I ground all the faces on those razors from post heat treat to finished in about 3 hours whilst taking liberal coffee breaks.
    Last edited by thp001; 06-11-2021 at 07:17 PM.
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    It's hard to capture just how fine and even the Trizact finishes are. Also to note, this is a wedge grind (10 inch contact wheel) and the edge flexes under the thumb like a hollow. You want to grind your faces just to an apex and no further. I do this when I move to the A300 Trizact and from then on you're just removing the previous scratches. Grinding to an apex will ensure a tiny bevel when you finally hone the razor. My grinder has a VFD with reverse and when I'm creating the faces I have the belt rotating away from me, much easier to grind that way (only when freehanding)

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    Last edited by thp001; 06-11-2021 at 07:19 PM.

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    Senior Member blabbermouth Substance's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by thp001 View Post
    I use a museum grade artificial ivory from Masecraft called col.849 but I have some of the Dave Warther Resin Ivory on the way so I'll compare the two. Both are extremely visually accurate, the Warther stuff has a black-light additive to check it is in fact artificial otherwise it's accurate enough to fool experts on inspection. Good enough for a small wedge. I'd like to use bone for scales at some point but just haven't got round to it.
    I have used this in the 1/8 sheet looks great but is flexible and gets worse when thinned out more when shaping, have a piece of the block version but played with it yet
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    Quote Originally Posted by Substance View Post
    I have used this in the 1/8” sheet looks great but is flexible and gets worse when thinned out more when shaping, have a piece of the block version but played with it yet
    Yeah you need to leave it a bit thicker otherwise it's too flexible, I've only used it on two razors so far but have used it on quite a few knives since you have the tang as backing. The Warther ivory is a cast resin so should be much stiffer and have the ability to go plenty thin, if so I'll make the switch over. Both are plenty good for wedges. I've been working in horn a lot recently, trying to do things the old ways just using files, scrapers, a coping saw for all the shaping with a bit of crocus cloth and polish for the finishing. I prefer natural materials but obviously with ivory you have to use synthetic, I mean, there's mammoth ivory but it's quite expensive. Once I get the Warther ivory I'll probably do a review/comparison post with the Masecraft stuff.
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