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Thread: Pinning

  1. #1
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    Default Pinning

    Ooh ooh, can I be first? :lol:

    When you are messing with repinning or working on cleaning up pivot pins, use 2 layers of duct tape with a hole the same size as the washer to protect the scales.



  2. #2
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    Default

    PS...

    Don't forget my book on CD to do much of the stuff necessary to restore your own razors. ink:

    http://www.billysblades.com/Straight%20Razor%20Book.htm



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    Default Book is on order

    When the shank is really lose in the scales and you want that snug / new feel. Is it necessary to re-pin? Is there a way to tighten the existing scales / pin to make it snug again?

    Where do you get the pins and tools to re-pin?

    TIA.

    Chris

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    ...Is it necessary to re-pin? Is there a way to tighten the existing scales / pin to make it snug again?
    It's a smidge difficult to tell without seeing the razor, but I would generally say "No, it is not necessary". These things are covered in my cd, but let me summarize some of it for you.

    You need a good ball peen hammer. A small one. Most use comes from the rounded end. This surface needs to be buffed smooth. The smoother, the better. Shiny shiny shiny... You also need a back-up to the hammer. I have two sections of rail road track that I use for an anvil. You could use just about anything metal, as long as it doesn't move around or bounce when you are using it.

    I have used a dremel burr to create different concentric size "divots" in my rails to use for the forming of the bottom pin and for stability. Pick a divot that is closest to the depth and shape of the pin you are working on.

    Rest the pin in the correct divot while holding the handle in the palm of your off hand, thumb and forefinger stabilizing the pivot end of the razor. With the driving hand, tap the pin with the rounded end of the hammer. Tap tap tap tap. Not hard or you will crack the scales.

    Here's a good rule of thumb when I say tap tap tap. Put your finger on a flat surface. Use the hammer to hit the fingernail where it does not cause pain... or bleeding This is the intensity that shoud be applied when peening. It make take 100 or more taps to get the job done, but you will not wreck anything.

    Run about 10 or so taps, check for the desired tightness, and flip the razor so you can peen the pin that was on the bottom. Repeat the process until you have a tight joint. Patience is the key.

    If you are coordinated enough, you can also use a modified 3/32 nail set that has a cavity with the same configuration of the pin crown. Place the nail set on the pin as you hit it with a hammer. Your off hand needs to hold the razor in place on the anvil and hold the nail set at the same time while you hit it with the hammer using the other hand. Or you could get some trusting soul to hold the razor while you hold the nail set and the hammer. You shoud try doing it the other way until you get the feel for peening. It is easy to hit too hard when using the nail set.

    To dress the pins, use a 3/32 or less nail punch that has been modified to fit in a drill. At a medium turning speed, take the pin of the razor to the drill and use slight pressure as it is spinning. This will smooth out the surface enough to use other dremel attachments to make the pin look nice. Do not take the drill to the razor for this process. Too many things happen when you do it this way.

    Have I made it as clear as mud? :?

  5. #5
    Hones & Honing randydance062449's Avatar
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    Yes you have Bill and thanks! Now for the big question, where can I buy the pins and collars that are being sold by Dovo? I know that I can use simple brass or nickel silver rod for pinning but the outside collars are not simple washers, although you could use simple brass washers available at hobby stores. I also want the spacers for use between the scales on a three pin razor.

    Thanks for the help!

    Randolph Tuttle, a SRP Mentor for residents of Minnesota & western Wisconsin

  6. #6
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    ...where can I buy the pins and collars that are being sold by Dovo...
    Bingo!

    http://www.classicshaving.com/page/page/523001.htm

    You can also get the butt spacers there.

    And you can also get some dandy scales from me... ink:

    http://www.billysblades.com/Razor%20Scales.htm

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    Thanks Bill, I had not noticed that classicshaving.com was selling the replacement parts kits.

    As for scales, I am making my own as we speak. Just not ready for prime time yet.


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    Thanks Bill! I saw your scales, those are quite nice!

    Actually it was how nice and snug those three razors you sold me that made me want to know how to snug some of mine up. I've scored some great eBay specials that were down-right ugly and after several nights sitting in front of the TV with Maas and a cloth,... they are looking really great!

    I honed them and all but three of the ten are taking an edge nicely. One really snug Wade &amp; Butcher has a chip in the edge from pitting,... but I think I can get it out -- it's such a nice razor, I refuse to give up. I've got some great 5/8 dubl ducks that have honed up to a really shaving blade. But the blades are SCARY loose!! So loose that I have to set it down to change hand positions!

    I'll try the peen hammer with the technique you outlined. If that doesn't work, I'll have to wait and tool up for the next approach.

    Thanks,
    Chris

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