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Thread: The Stub-Tailed Shavers

  1. #891
    www.edge-dynamics.com JOB15's Avatar
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    Looks like a stubby .nice
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  3. #892
    Senior Member ScienceGuy's Avatar
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    To do this kind of grind, they would simply grind the razor initially and then turn it perpendicular so that the stone was spinning along the length of the blade. It's why the cut continues all the way up into the tang, where it diminishes. Some pieces of cutlery from the period are quite extraordinary, it was not a matter of skill, just development of style.
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  4. #893
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    I think that's it. Moreover, there are blades that are not finished: with a slot between the spine and the wedge. By then, these bands were still somehow processed. And the sock turned out as a hollow ground, and the heel as a wedge.Name:  Screenshot_20210121-235109_1.jpg
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    Photo from the web, not mine.

  5. #894
    Senior Member ScienceGuy's Avatar
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    It's just a stylistic choice, and those with the single steep hollow at the top of the blade like above are somewhat common. Even back in 1816 Smith's Key there are examples of the rattler grind and some more fancy ones:

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    Name:  SMITH_Key_razors6.jpg
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    Here's another Roberts and a Gratian with fancy work (the Gratian has a normal grind but a horizontal extremely narrow slot right near the spine, a little less fancy than the example in Smith's Key above):

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    Name:  Screen Shot 2021-01-21 at 10.17.05 PM.jpg
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    I always wondered about this grind. I have a similar Robert’s
    Name:  629300F2-4E75-4313-86DB-F8AA58E0BEE1.jpg
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  8. #896
    www.edge-dynamics.com JOB15's Avatar
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    I have deconstructed quite a few old straights and the skills of the craftsmen really impresses me.
    Unfortunately i think some of their skills are lost to time..

    And they dressed so well for filthy jobs..

    Name:  21-age-1850sand-clothes-1850-company-photo.jpg
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  9. #897
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    I wonder if those were their Sunday clothes for the special picture?
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    Tim

  10. #898
    Senior Member ScienceGuy's Avatar
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    I missed getting the original, but this is the "costume of cutlers of Yorkshire" in 1814, about the same time period.

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  12. #899
    Senior Member blabbermouth tintin's Avatar
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    As i understand it a waist coat (vest) was normal everyday wear. The tradition 18th,19th century shirt had very long tails and was worn alone as a night shirt. I guess you wouldn't just wear your pajamas to work

  13. #900
    32t
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    I looked up 1820's fashion and of course I got what the rich people wore.

    Should be put in another thread but interesting!
    Tim

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