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Thread: $1000 vs $50 shave

  1. #31
    Gatling-Gun Jerry Gasman's Avatar
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    Good looking razor Rez. Not special, but if it sha es well, its hard to complain.
    It's just Sharpening, right?
    Jerry...

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  3. #32
    Senior Member azgabe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sharptonn View Post
    Another thing to consider. Everyone goes for a name. Filarmonica, Henckels, Iwasaki, and anything with a 14 on it.

    In vintage razors, particularly Solingens, much quality can be had at little cost.
    Why?
    Because hundreds of expert maker's names are lost to history or are relatively obscure due to WWII.
    They are not the names which are foremost in the forums or those which command high prices.
    If newer guys (and SOME older ones) would learn what to look for in a QUALITY vintage razor, Nice ones can be had reasonably. As good or better than the aforementioned marques.

    An old SB Anchor razor sold by Muntz & Co. No..Not a Wade and Butcher FBU!
    Would not trade it for one. Blade cost 85 bucks.

    Attachment 290003

    A fine German blade sold by John Holler of New York.
    Not name recognition as with Henckels......50 dollar blade. Sweet shaver.
    Would not trade for a Henckels.....
    Attachment 290004

    The unknowns like this 7/8 Pattern Solingen. No idea who made it. Still looking.....
    Cleaned-up and honed. Not even unpinned. Trade for a Filarmonica? No Thanks!
    37 bucks....

    Attachment 290005

    None of these names will make someone a god on the forums.
    In fact, I own Henckels, Iwasaki, and Filarmonica.
    I like the shaves from razors such as this every bit as the big names.

    Sometimes more!
    @sharptonn Please send PayPal info where to send funds to.

  4. #33
    Junior Tinkerer Srdjan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mainaman View Post
    I did not pay anything for my Iwasaki razors.
    So the Universe must be trying to balance itself out now, with prices of his razors on eBay etc... Just how many did you get for nothing Stefan, I need to know how long until the balance is fully reestablished.

  5. #34
    Heat it and beat it Bruno's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by RobinK View Post
    There is another point, too, and that one is less obvious: Nostalgia. As in, people tend to romanticise the making and use of razors. Most of the production process was not performed by master grinders in prestigious workshops. Razor making was, in fact, one of the shittier jobs in Solingen, and widows, invalids, and children played an important role. Nothing nostalgic about that. Forging razors was piecework. Think of a dimly lit, unheated shed with a long conveyor belt driving a dozen or so hammers. Workers throwing finished products over their shoulders onto the floor of the shed, where someone with a wheelbarrow came to mop them up. There are guided tours of one such production facility still available if you ever make it to Solingen. It was noisy, smelly, and generally unpleasant.

    So, yes, that $50 path is the one to go, really. The market for razors is crazy, and has been for years. Beginners stand absolutely no chance of getting a good deal on a hyped razor. But there are decent razors to be had for little money still if you know where to look.
    I've toured a museum in Italy where you could see these things.
    Though I have to say that in terms of grinding and polishing, razors and scissors were among the better jobs, simply because they didn't kill you as quickly as other jobs. I am not familiar with solingen production houses, but I know a good bit about sheffield production. Fork and needle grinders were the most miserable jobs because fork grinding was a job with a very high grit and dirt expulsion, and needle grinding was done dry. According to the report of the surgeon general, sometime during the 1800s, the average lifespan of a fork grinder was 27. At that age you could expect to die of some horrible lung disease.

    There was also absolutely no concern for health and safety, both from the manufacturers or the employees themselves.
    RobinK, outback and Gasman like this.
    Til shade is gone, til water is gone, Into the shadow with teeth bared, screaming defiance with the last breath.
    To spit in Sightblinder’s eye on the Last Day

  6. #35
    Heat it and beat it Bruno's Avatar
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    I agree totally about the shave quality. You cannot buy your way to a better shave.
    As a maker or expensive things, I understand that my work should shave well. But that's not why people buy my things.
    Yes they should shave as well as possible. That goes without saying.
    But people don't buy my razors just to get a good shave, any more than you would buy a Patek watch just for keeping time.
    Til shade is gone, til water is gone, Into the shadow with teeth bared, screaming defiance with the last breath.
    To spit in Sightblinder’s eye on the Last Day

  7. #36
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    I've been straight shaving for coming up on a year now, and started with a Dovo best, and although it is a decent razor, the 5/8 was a bit small for my hand. After a few months, I purchased a Brian Brown in 6/8, and prefer it in every aspect over the Dovo. I've one coticule, which I believe to be an excellent finisher, and use it for touching up when needed. I took the advice of learning your stone, and perfecting technique, before jumping around with different hones, and razors. Now days, with good technique, knowing my stone, and good stropping skills, I get excellent results everytime out, and using one razor, one strop, and one hone. Patience can be a virtue.

  8. #37
    illegitimum non carborundum Utopian's Avatar
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    Skimonster, that is excellent!

    Many of us as fanatical hobbyists have gone a bit (or more) too far with acquisitions. In reality you only need one razor, one strop, and one hone. As long as you are happy with your shaves, then you already have all that you need.

  9. #38
    Senior Member blabbermouth
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    I guess the main thrust of the thread is that newbies should not think that spending money on new gear expensive will greatly improve their shave when they haven't got their technique ironed out yet. Something like owning and driving a Grand Prix car with no experience does not make you a successful Grand Prix driver. Not that anyone should not, if they wish, buy an expensive piece of kit. Just don't BS yourself into thinking it will make a great deal of difference to your shave. That is if the shave is what matters to you.

    Once you are getting good consistent shaves there are numerous ADs you can succumb to and enjoy should you wish to or just stick with one razor that is doing the job for you. Either way so long as you are happy is all that matters.

    Bob
    Life is a terminal illness in the end

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  11. #39
    Senior Member blabbermouth RezDog's Avatar
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    That sums it up nicely Bob.
    It's not what you know, it's who you take fishing!

  12. #40
    Senior Member markbignosekelly's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by skimonster View Post
    I've been straight shaving for coming up on a year now, and started with a Dovo best, and although it is a decent razor, the 5/8 was a bit small for my hand. After a few months, I purchased a Brian Brown in 6/8, and prefer it in every aspect over the Dovo. I've one coticule, which I believe to be an excellent finisher, and use it for touching up when needed. I took the advice of learning your stone, and perfecting technique, before jumping around with different hones, and razors. Now days, with good technique, knowing my stone, and good stropping skills, I get excellent results everytime out, and using one razor, one strop, and one hone. Patience can be a virtue.
    Perfect example. Learn your razor, learn your strop, learn your hone, perfect your technique.


    Then let the ADs commence

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