Page 7 of 8 FirstFirst ... 345678 LastLast
Results 61 to 70 of 72
Like Tree252Likes

Thread: An idea for a contact grinder.

  1. #61
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    53
    Thanked: 6

    Default

    Man if i had access to a CNC id be all over that.....fast, accurate and the ability to do just about everything shy of finish grinding......

  2. #62
    Captain ARAD. Voidmonster's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Pacifica, CA
    Posts
    2,318
    Thanked: 1974

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jfk742 View Post
    You’re edge thickness should end up in the .005” area. I would think you could go slightly less than 2mm for ht.

    You could set your drum sander up to do final sanding pretty easily I would think. A machinists vise with some flat stock and a series of spacers may work to keep from getting wavy. As you get close to final thickness free hand it to blend in anything around the shoulder since that may be a problem area with the swoop you’ll need to do to get the shoulder right.

    I should be up and running in a month or two for heat treating so if you want to experiment with different thicknesses for heat treating we could probably get something figured out so you’re not spending all your time on finish grinding. Finish grinding is what took me the longest. There seems to generally be enough thickness to take care of any warping due to ht when grinding post ht. Smiling blades lend themselves to being slightly warped and still being able to maintain an even bevel and easy honing.
    I'm really looking forward to you getting your setup running! Another member up north has offered his HT services in the interim. It's gonna depend on how long it takes me to actually jump on the grinding. I keep rethinking my approach!

    Quote Originally Posted by 6cuda6 View Post
    Man if i had access to a CNC id be all over that.....fast, accurate and the ability to do just about everything shy of finish grinding......
    It's where I want to be, but the learning curve is substantial!
    Geezer likes this.
    -Zak Jarvis. Writer. Artist. Bon vivant.

  3. #63
    Captain ARAD. Voidmonster's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Pacifica, CA
    Posts
    2,318
    Thanked: 1974

    Default

    Out of curiosity, I just checked the Roberts razor I'm shamelessly copying.

    It looks like the grind on it was done on the flat side of the stone for roughing, then hollow after heat treat. It's slightly concave. It's also not the traditional T shaped rattler. It's maybe three times thicker just under the lip of the spine than at the edge.
    Geezer likes this.
    -Zak Jarvis. Writer. Artist. Bon vivant.

  4. #64
    Captain ARAD. Voidmonster's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Pacifica, CA
    Posts
    2,318
    Thanked: 1974

    Default

    Also, I’ve mentioned it a couple times, but this is the RSO I made to see if my drum sander setup was up to the task.

    Name:  7C49FD2E-4D62-479D-B3E7-40988B64CCC0.jpg
Views: 43
Size:  52.2 KB

    Completely unusable for a variety of reasons, not least of which being it’s made from steel I found in a castoff bin and was part of a very large sheet.

    But the spine is wrecked and the thickness is wrong and it’s not thick enough for the blade width. But, it told me this was at least a semi-viable venture and it cost nothing to do.
    Geezer, 32t, tintin and 2 others like this.
    -Zak Jarvis. Writer. Artist. Bon vivant.

  5. #65
    Senior Member blabbermouth outback's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Akron, Ohio
    Posts
    8,385
    Thanked: 3469

    Default

    Well its a sweet looking replica of what's to come, Zac.
    I really dig those ol 1700 razors.
    Geezer, Voidmonster and Steel like this.
    Mike

  6. The Following User Says Thank You to outback For This Useful Post:

    Voidmonster (03-16-2019)

  7. #66
    Captain ARAD. Voidmonster's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Pacifica, CA
    Posts
    2,318
    Thanked: 1974

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by outback View Post
    Well its a sweet looking replica of what's to come, Zac.
    I really dig those ol 1700 razors.

    This one's actually from the very early 1800's and persisted for quite some time -- 1830's at least. But it wears its lineage right on the sleeve and isn't much of a break from the past at all.
    Geezer and outback like this.
    -Zak Jarvis. Writer. Artist. Bon vivant.

  8. The Following User Says Thank You to Voidmonster For This Useful Post:

    outback (03-16-2019)

  9. #67
    Senior Member jfk742's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Pinole, ca
    Posts
    992
    Thanked: 230

    Default

    Did you try setting a bevel on the rso? Only reason I ask is it will show you where you need to grind more, was super helpful for me to get my bevel and those the steel behind the edge even and any waves out of the hollows, or flats in your case.
    Voidmonster likes this.

  10. The Following User Says Thank You to jfk742 For This Useful Post:

    Voidmonster (03-16-2019)

  11. #68
    Senior Member blabbermouth Geezer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    EauClaire,WI
    Posts
    7,365
    Thanked: 3722
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Voidmonster View Post
    Oh, I forgot to add the things I used here:

    'Alternative Ivory' from Masecraft

    #80 drill bits for the small pins and #77 bits for the one large one

    30 gauge sterling silver wire for the little pins
    24 gauge sterling silver wire for the big pin

    FYI, sterling silver wire in these gauges is very cheap. It's a TINY amount! And even for all those tiny pins, with some losses, I used less than half of what I bought. 12 inches of both sizes cost less than a dollar.
    IF you are not yet using a peck type feed on your drill, try it. What that does is brings swarf to the surface and allows a cooler drilling. Ok, "peck drilling" is setting the down feed to retract every so often and the go back to depth and finishing the holes. A little bit more time but less damage to the work pieces. Some CNC mills have the sotware to do it installed by the maker. Often use in PC board fab and electronics work.
    YMV ~Richard
    Voidmonster likes this.
    Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.
    - Oscar Wilde

  12. The Following User Says Thank You to Geezer For This Useful Post:

    Voidmonster (03-16-2019)

  13. #69
    Captain ARAD. Voidmonster's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Pacifica, CA
    Posts
    2,318
    Thanked: 1974

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jfk742 View Post
    Did you try setting a bevel on the rso? Only reason I ask is it will show you where you need to grind more, was super helpful for me to get my bevel and those the steel behind the edge even and any waves out of the hollows, or flats in your case.
    I didn't try that. More likely than not, it's pretty screwed up. I took a couple large bits out of the spine at the beginning of the grinding and somehow they just kept sliding the wrong way -- which was the major inspiration for my jig idea.

    Quote Originally Posted by Geezer View Post
    IF you are not yet using a peck type feed on your drill, try it. What that does is brings swarf to the surface and allows a cooler drilling. Ok, "peck drilling" is setting the down feed to retract every so often and the go back to depth and finishing the holes. A little bit more time but less damage to the work pieces. Some CNC mills have the sotware to do it installed by the maker. Often use in PC board fab and electronics work.
    YMV ~Richard
    I really should have thought of that. All the work was done on my extremely manual drill press, which unfortunately has only 4 speeds "slowest, not as slow, pretty fast, and fast as it'll go". Presumably the original pulleys had rated speeds, but the drill was born well before I was and I suspect the manual was lost before I showed up too. I've been thinking about replacing the replacement motor with a DC induction motor from a treadmill and adding a tachometer. It'd be very nice to have continuously variable speed and a tachometer. I've killed so many drill bits working on metal.
    -Zak Jarvis. Writer. Artist. Bon vivant.

  14. #70
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    53
    Thanked: 6

    Default

    Have you tried a Dremmel in the press they make? It can really be slowed down and it should chuck up those tiny bits well....
    32t and Voidmonster like this.

Page 7 of 8 FirstFirst ... 345678 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •