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Thread: 3 Videos ..Bevel setting / Synthetics / Nagura Progression.

  1. #21
    www.edge-dynamics.com JOB15's Avatar
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    Hi,
    Yes is the answer.
    However you can hone without joining /killing the edge, it is just a preference.
    Whatever works for you
    www.edge-dynamics.com

  2. #22
    Senior Member lloydw's Avatar
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    Thank you - I’ve never thought to try it on any other stage than bevel set. I will give it a try
    JOB15 likes this.

  3. #23
    www.edge-dynamics.com JOB15's Avatar
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    Let me know how you get on.
    Any questing anytime, on here or email me, I'm always happy to help.
    Joseph
    boz likes this.
    www.edge-dynamics.com

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  5. #24
    Senior Member blabbermouth
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    I have a question please - do you only kill the edge on the bevel set and then on the next stone up (5k in your video). This would apply to any stone that follows the bevel set on synth progression - be it 3k or 4K or 5k?

    The goal is a straight edge, where the bevels meet.

    If you look at the edge with magnification at 1k, it is not straight, it is ragged. The edge does not get really straight, until about 6- 8k.

    If you joint after 1k, the 4k starts out with a straight edge, and you just have to get the bevels to meet.

    Killing refers to removing the edge on any hard object, by rolling the edge. The cutting edge is super thin and not even visible at 400x, so it does not take much pressure to roll the actual edge.

    Jointing cuts off the edge, by running the edge on a stone, which leaves a straighter edge, one lite pressure stroke on the corner of the stone is all you need.

    Once the bevels are flat and meeting, a jointed edge can be restored in 15-20 laps or less. It just eliminates another variable and I believe makes a stronger edge.
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  7. #25
    Senior Member blabbermouth
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    One other issue diagnosing benefit. Joint, one lite lap on the stone corner, now look at the edge, straight down on the edge with lighted magnification.

    Here, what you see is reversed, the edge should look shiny, any dark spots are chips, large dark spots, you should look at from the side to see how deep the chips are. You may want to mark that chip with a sharpie mark from edge to spine, as a witness mark so you can easily track the chip removal.

    As you hone and the edge comes together, meeting, the shiny edge is dark and shiny spots are chips or where bevels are not meeting.

    If you look straight down on the edge and your scope/loup touches the edge, do a few more finish laps just in case you rolled the edge where it touched. If you hear the dreaded “Tink” with a Carson scope, you dinged the edge. A handful of laps will bring it back.

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    lloydw (03-23-2020)

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